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Conjugal arms of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge
Released today are the conjugal Arms of Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, which were approved in February this year by Her Majesty The Queen. Conjugal Arms are those that show the separate shields of a husband and wife, side by side. In this case, the two Shields are the Duke’s on the left and the Duchess’s on the right with both supported by the Duke of Cambridge’s Supporters of the Royal Lion and Unicorn, which is made to look different from The Queen’s by adding his white label of three points around their necks with the central point charged with a red escallop shell taken from the Duke of Cambridge’s mother’s Arms of Spencer.

Conjugal arms of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

Released today are the conjugal Arms of Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, which were approved in February this year by Her Majesty The Queen. Conjugal Arms are those that show the separate shields of a husband and wife, side by side. In this case, the two Shields are the Duke’s on the left and the Duchess’s on the right with both supported by the Duke of Cambridge’s Supporters of the Royal Lion and Unicorn, which is made to look different from The Queen’s by adding his white label of three points around their necks with the central point charged with a red escallop shell taken from the Duke of Cambridge’s mother’s Arms of Spencer.

(Source: college-of-arms.gov.uk)

This should have been our first clue that Harry would be the “wild” one in the family.

This should have been our first clue that Harry would be the “wild” one in the family.

The people’s princess…

The people’s princess…

Wedgwood Commemorative Mug: The Birth of Prince ‘Harry’
This mug, designed by Richard Guyatt, was made to celebrate the 1984 birth of HRH Prince Henry (known universally as Prince Harry), the Prince and Princess of Wales’ second child.
© Wedgwood Museum

Wedgwood Commemorative Mug: The Birth of Prince ‘Harry’

This mug, designed by Richard Guyatt, was made to celebrate the 1984 birth of HRH Prince Henry (known universally as Prince Harry), the Prince and Princess of Wales’ second child.

© Wedgwood Museum

Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, KG, PC
A member of the Whig Party, the 2nd Earl Grey was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from November 1830 to July 1834.
The Earl Grey blend of black tea is named after the 2nd Earl Grey, who reputedly received a gift, probably a diplomatic perquisite, of tea flavoured with bergamot oil, taken from bergamot, a citrus fruit typical of Southeast Asia.
In his personal life; Grey married Mary Elizabeth Ponsonby (1776–1861), only daughter of William Ponsonby, 1st Baron Ponsonby and Hon. Louisa Molesworth in 1794. The marriage was a fruitful one; between 1796 and 1819 the couple had ten sons and six daughters.
Their third daughter Lady Elizabeth Grey whom married John Crocker Bulteel is one of the great-great-great-great-grandmothers of Diana, Princess of Wales.
Portrait by Charles Turner © National Portrait Gallery, London

Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, KG, PC

A member of the Whig Party, the 2nd Earl Grey was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from November 1830 to July 1834.

The Earl Grey blend of black tea is named after the 2nd Earl Grey, who reputedly received a gift, probably a diplomatic perquisite, of tea flavoured with bergamot oil, taken from bergamot, a citrus fruit typical of Southeast Asia.

In his personal life; Grey married Mary Elizabeth Ponsonby (1776–1861), only daughter of William Ponsonby, 1st Baron Ponsonby and Hon. Louisa Molesworth in 1794. The marriage was a fruitful one; between 1796 and 1819 the couple had ten sons and six daughters.

Their third daughter Lady Elizabeth Grey whom married John Crocker Bulteel is one of the great-great-great-great-grandmothers of Diana, Princess of Wales.

Portrait by Charles Turner © National Portrait Gallery, London

Diana, Princess of Wales
The publication of this portrait in Vogue magazine in February 1981 coincided with the official announcement of the engagement of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer.
Commissioned by Vogue as part of a ‘Portrait Portfolio’ of young aristocratic women by the photographer Lord Snowdon, it was used by several magazines and newspapers when the engagement was announced. Lady Diana wears a chiffon blouse by Emanuel, the designers who went on to create her wedding dress
Photograph by Lord Snowdon for Vogue 1981 © Condé Nast Publications Ltd

Diana, Princess of Wales

The publication of this portrait in Vogue magazine in February 1981 coincided with the official announcement of the engagement of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer.

Commissioned by Vogue as part of a ‘Portrait Portfolio’ of young aristocratic women by the photographer Lord Snowdon, it was used by several magazines and newspapers when the engagement was announced. Lady Diana wears a chiffon blouse by Emanuel, the designers who went on to create her wedding dress

Photograph by Lord Snowdon for Vogue 1981 © Condé Nast Publications Ltd

1881 Glass Coach
Purchased for use at King George V’s Coronation in 1911. The Glass Coach has carried several Royal brides to their weddings – Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon in 1923, Princess Alexandra in 1963, Princess Anne in 1973, Lady Diana Spencer in 1981 and Miss Sarah Ferguson in 1986.

1881 Glass Coach

Purchased for use at King George V’s Coronation in 1911. The Glass Coach has carried several Royal brides to their weddings – Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon in 1923, Princess Alexandra in 1963, Princess Anne in 1973, Lady Diana Spencer in 1981 and Miss Sarah Ferguson in 1986.