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The Cambridge Commemorative China Collection

In keeping with royal tradition, the Royal Collection Trust has released the latest pieces of commemorative china to celebrate the birth of the Royal Baby.

HRH The Prince of Cambridge will have his very own set of limited edition commemorative china, to go along with the pieces which were made exclusively for the Royal Wedding. The official selection includes a dessert plate, pillbox and loving cup. 

The design on the commemorative china features the lion and unicorn from the Royal Arms supporting the coronet of TRH The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. The oak leaves surrounding the design are taken from the Middleton family’s coat of arms.

Made in Staffordshire, using traditional methods that have remained unchanged for 250 years, each piece of the English fine bone china is skillfully finished by hand using 22-carat gold.

The name of the Royal Baby will be added to the collection following the official announcement.

Cambridge House, Piccadilly, London

Cambridge House was built from 1756 to 1761 by Charles Wyndham, 2nd Earl of Egremont. The architect was Matthew Brettingham the Elder, better known for his more impressive work for the Curzons at Kedleston.

The house was built in a late Palladian style. It has three main storeys plus basement and attics and is seven bays wide. As is usual in a London mansion of the period the first floor (second floor in American English) is the principal floor, containing a circuit of reception rooms. This floor has the highest ceilings and its status is emphasized externally by a Venetian window in the centre.

Given its progenitor, it was originally known as Egremont House. Early in the 1820s, however, it was sold to George Cholmondeley, 1st Marquess of Cholmondeley and thus became known as Cholmondeley House (pronounced “chumley”). In 1829 it came into the hands of Field Marshal H.R.H. The Prince Adolphus Frederick, Duke of Cambridge, Earl of Tipperary, Baron Culloden.

Duke of Cambridge

Born in Buckingham Palace, Prince Adolphus was the tenth child of George III & Queen Charlotte. He also served as Viceroy of Hanover on behalf of his brothers George IV and William IV. His granddaughter, Mary of Teck, was Queen consort of the United Kingdom and paternal grandmother of the current monarch, Elizabeth II. With the Duke’s long occupancy at No. 94 Piccadilly the newly royal home became better known as Cambridge House.

Funeral Procession

Upon his death on 8 July 1850 at Cambridge House, ownership changed again when the townhouse was purchased by Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Lord Palmerston bought the home and lived there during most of his two premierships from 1855 to 1865. It was his London residence and the site of many splendid social and political gatherings.

After Palmerston’s death at Brocket Hall in Hertfordshire in 1865, his body was taken to Cambridge House from which his funeral procession departed to Westminster Abbey. Lord Palmerston had requested that he be buried at Romsey Abbey, but the Cabinet insisted that he receive a State Funeral and be buried in Westminster. There had only been three previous State Funerals for non Royalty before that of Lord Palmerston.

Funeral Hearse

With Cambridge House being vacant, the property was then purchased by the Naval & Military Club, a gentlemen’s club originally founded in 1862 and in need of a new space. The club organised the traffic into the forecourt of Cambridge House by affixing large letters stating ‘IN’ on the west gate and ‘OUT’ on the east gate, thus gaining for itself the nickname of “the In and Out”.

Cambridge House Interior

By 1999, the Club moved to new premises, having sold Cambridge House in 1996 to entrepreneur Simon Halabi for £50 million. Halabi planned to convert the property into a private members club and hotel, part of his Mentmore Towers project. The project was halted in 2009, when Halabi’s companies went into bankruptcy.

Cambridge House Exterior

Cambridge House and several adjacent buildings were offered for sale, but the building has been vacant since the Naval and Military Club left, and has fallen into a state of disrepair. Most recently the home has gone through another sale (alongside its adjoining properties) for £150 million to David and Simon Reuben, the enterprising pair of brothers from a Bombay Jewish family. The Reubens say it’s too early to tell what they might do with the property, but there are thoughts of perhaps selling it on to the current Duke of Cambridge, Prince William.

Cambridge House

A Royal Family Portrait (c. 1984)
The Prince & Princess of Wales with William and newly born Harry.

A Royal Family Portrait (c. 1984)

The Prince & Princess of Wales with William and newly born Harry.

The boy who would be King…
Prince William and his parents attend his first official photocall in the garden at Kensington Palace, London, on Dec. 14, 1983. When he was 7, William reportedly told his mother he wanted to become a police officer so he could protect her. His little brother replied that he couldn’t — he had to be king.

The boy who would be King…

Prince William and his parents attend his first official photocall in the garden at Kensington Palace, London, on Dec. 14, 1983. When he was 7, William reportedly told his mother he wanted to become a police officer so he could protect her. His little brother replied that he couldn’t — he had to be king.

Princess Diana with William & Harry on the piano at home in Kensington Palace
Photo by Tim Graham (Oct. 4, 1985)
© Tim Graham/Getty Images

Princess Diana with William & Harry on the piano at home in Kensington Palace

Photo by Tim Graham (Oct. 4, 1985)

© Tim Graham/Getty Images

I think it’s very important that you make your own decision about what you are. Therefore you’re responsible for your actions, so you don’t blame other people.

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge
The Princess and her Princes (c.1992)
by Derry Moore, 12th Earl of Drogheda
One of the many images recorded in part of a series, taken at Kensington Palace, for use as a family Christmas card.

The Princess and her Princes (c.1992)

by Derry Moore, 12th Earl of Drogheda

One of the many images recorded in part of a series, taken at Kensington Palace, for use as a family Christmas card.