grace. elegance. class.

Arms of the four traditional provinces of Ireland
The four traditional provinces of Ireland (Munster, Leinster, Connacht and Ulster) are popularly displayed quartered as the arms of Ireland. The Four Provinces Flag and variants of it are used by various all-Ireland sports teams and cultural organisations.The order in which the arms appear varies.

Arms of the four traditional provinces of Ireland

The four traditional provinces of Ireland (Munster, Leinster, Connacht and Ulster) are popularly displayed quartered as the arms of Ireland. The Four Provinces Flag and variants of it are used by various all-Ireland sports teams and cultural organisations.The order in which the arms appear varies.

Royal Regalia: The official royal dress code

Traditionally the linings of medieval coronation cloaks and some other garments, usually reserved to use by high-ranking peers and royalty, were made by sewing many ermine furs together to produce a luxurious white fur with patterns of hanging black-tipped tails.

Her Highness Princess Marie Louise is pictured at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II with a slightly different cloak. As a granddaughter of Queen Victoria, she was the last member of the royal family to be styled ‘Her Highness’ and as such her crimson robe was different and not lined with the traditional ermine but a simple crimson silk velvet.

In practice, rows of sealskin spots on the cape designate the peer’s rank; dukes use four rows, marquesses three and a half, earls three, viscounts two and a half, and barons and lords of Parliament two.

Royal dukes use six rows of ermine, ermine on the front of the cape and long trains borne by pages.

Peeresses’ ranks are designated not by sealskin spots, but by the length of their trains and the width of the ermine edging on the same.

In the case of Princess Marie Louise, although a member of the royal family, her position was considered as a distant-cousin and too far removed to warrant the traditional regalia. Her position in the family was not that of a Princess of the United Kingdom but a Princess of Schleswig-Holstein, which she no longer retained when the family removed their German titles after the royal proclamation by George V.

As such, she was no longer entitled to the same robe and wore a simple crimson silk velvet train instead.

Washington Old Hall
The restored manor house is located in the area of Washington in the City of Sunderland in Tyne and Wear, England. It is best known as the ancestral home of the family of George Washington, the first President of the United States.
William de Hertburne, an ancestor of George Washington, assumed tenancy of the Wessyngtonlands from the Bishop of Durham for an annual fee of £4. Soon after, he changed his name to William de Wessyngton (later Washington). Although he used the Norman French spelling (based on a Middle English rendition of the original). The estate is of Anglo-Saxon origin, originally being “Hwæssaingatūn”, meaning “estates of the descendents of Hwæssa” (Hwæssa being rendered Wassa in Modern English).
In 1613 the Washington family moved south to Sulgrave Manor, and the manor was sold. Gradually the manor house fell into disrepair, and in 1936 the building was declared unfit for human habitation. It was rescued from demolition by Fred Hill, a local teacher, who created what is now the “Friends of the Old Hall” to press for restoration of the building.
Final restoration was completed in 1955, and in 1957 the National Trust assumed responsibility for the building.

Washington Old Hall

The restored manor house is located in the area of Washington in the City of Sunderland in Tyne and Wear, England. It is best known as the ancestral home of the family of George Washington, the first President of the United States.

William de Hertburne, an ancestor of George Washington, assumed tenancy of the Wessyngtonlands from the Bishop of Durham for an annual fee of £4. Soon after, he changed his name to William de Wessyngton (later Washington). Although he used the Norman French spelling (based on a Middle English rendition of the original). The estate is of Anglo-Saxon origin, originally being “Hwæssaingatūn”, meaning “estates of the descendents of Hwæssa” (Hwæssa being rendered Wassa in Modern English).

In 1613 the Washington family moved south to Sulgrave Manor, and the manor was sold. Gradually the manor house fell into disrepair, and in 1936 the building was declared unfit for human habitation. It was rescued from demolition by Fred Hill, a local teacher, who created what is now the “Friends of the Old Hall” to press for restoration of the building.

Final restoration was completed in 1955, and in 1957 the National Trust assumed responsibility for the building.

Anna Maria Russell, Duchess of Bedford
A lifelong friend of Queen Victoria, whom she served as a Lady of the Bedchamber between 1837 and 1841. The Duchess is best remembered as the creator of the British meal afternoon tea.
Whilst visiting the 5th Duke of Rutland at Belvoir Castle in the 18th century, dinner came to be served later and later in the day, the normal time being between 7:00 and 8:30 p.m. An extra meal called luncheon had been created to fill the midday gap between breakfast and dinner, but as this new meal was very light, the long afternoon with no refreshment at all left people feeling hungry.
The Duchess found a light meal of tea (usually Darjeeling) and cakes or sandwiches was the perfect balance. She found taking an afternoon snack to be such a perfect refreshment that she soon began inviting her friends to join her. Afternoon tea quickly became an established and convivial repast in many middle and upper class households.
Portrait by John Cochran, after G.R. Wood stipple engraving, published 1834

© National Portrait Gallery

Anna Maria Russell, Duchess of Bedford

A lifelong friend of Queen Victoria, whom she served as a Lady of the Bedchamber between 1837 and 1841. The Duchess is best remembered as the creator of the British meal afternoon tea.

Whilst visiting the 5th Duke of Rutland at Belvoir Castle in the 18th century, dinner came to be served later and later in the day, the normal time being between 7:00 and 8:30 p.m. An extra meal called luncheon had been created to fill the midday gap between breakfast and dinner, but as this new meal was very light, the long afternoon with no refreshment at all left people feeling hungry.

The Duchess found a light meal of tea (usually Darjeeling) and cakes or sandwiches was the perfect balance. She found taking an afternoon snack to be such a perfect refreshment that she soon began inviting her friends to join her. Afternoon tea quickly became an established and convivial repast in many middle and upper class households.

Portrait by John Cochran, after G.R. Wood stipple engraving, published 1834

© National Portrait Gallery

(Source: npg.org.uk)

Flags of the German Empire

Flags of the German Empire

Alfonso XIII of Spain
A monarch from birth; as his father Alfonso XII had died the previous year. His mother, Maria Christina of Austria, served as his regent until his 16th birthday in 1902. Due to family ties to both sides, King Alfonso kept his kingdom neutral in World War I (1914–1918).
From 1923 to 1930, Alfonso supported the dictator Miguel Primo de Rivera. In 1931, in the face of overwhelming popular rejection, Alfonso fled the country as the Second Spanish Republic was proclaimed. In exile, he retained his claim to the throne until 1941, when he abdicated in favor of his son Juan. He died six weeks later.

Alfonso XIII of Spain

A monarch from birth; as his father Alfonso XII had died the previous year. His mother, Maria Christina of Austria, served as his regent until his 16th birthday in 1902. Due to family ties to both sides, King Alfonso kept his kingdom neutral in World War I (1914–1918).

From 1923 to 1930, Alfonso supported the dictator Miguel Primo de Rivera. In 1931, in the face of overwhelming popular rejection, Alfonso fled the country as the Second Spanish Republic was proclaimed. In exile, he retained his claim to the throne until 1941, when he abdicated in favor of his son Juan. He died six weeks later.

(Source: thelastkaiser)

"Year Of The Three Kings”
Postcard with the photos of George V, Edward VIII and George VI, the three Kings of England who each ruled in 1936. Dates included.
Credit to Galt Museum & Archives.

"Year Of The Three Kings”

Postcard with the photos of George V, Edward VIII and George VI, the three Kings of England who each ruled in 1936. Dates included.

Credit to Galt Museum & Archives.